StorSimple Software update 3.0 (17759)


This post describes one experience of updating StorSimple 8100 series device from version 0.2 (17361) to current  (8 September 2016) version 3.0 (17759). It’s worth noting that:

  • StorSimple 8k series devices that shipped in mid 2015 came with software version 0.2
  • Typically, the device checks periodically for updates and when updates are found a note similar to this image is shown in the device/maintenance page: storsimple3-03
  • The device admin then picks the time when to deploy the updates, by clicking INSTALL UPDATES link. This kicks off an update job, which may take several hoursstorsimple3-01
  • This update method is known as updating StorSimple device using the classic Azure portal, as opposed to updating the StorSimple device using the serial interface by deploying the update as a hotfix.
  • Released updates may not show up, in spite of scanning for updates manually several times: storsimple3-04
    The image above was taken on 9 September 2016 (update 3.0 is the latest at this time). It shows that no updates are available even after scanning for updates several times. The reason is that Microsoft deploys updates in a ‘phased rollout’, so they’re not available in all regions at all times.
    storsimple3-05
  • Updates are cumulative. This means for a device running version 0.2 for example, we upgrade directly to 3.0 without the need to manually upgdate to any intermediary version first.
  • An update may include one or both of the following 2 types:
    • Software updates: This is an update of the core 2012 R2 server OS that’s running on the device. Microsoft identifies this type as a non intrusive update. It can be deployed while the device is in production, and should not affect mounted iSCSI volumes. Under the covers, the device controller0 and controller1 are 2 nodes in a traditional Microsoft failover cluster. The device uses the traditional Cluster Aware Update to update the 2 controllers. It updates and reboots the passive controller first, fails over the device (iSCSI target and other clustered roles) from one controller to the other, then updates and reboots the second controller. Again this should be a no-down-time process.
    • Maintenance mode updates:

      These are updates to shared components in the device that require down time. Typically we see LSI SAS controller updates and disk firmware updates in this category. Maintenance mode updates must be done from the serial interface console (not Azure web interface or PowerShell interface). The typical down time for a maintenance mode update is about 30 minutes, although I would schedule a 2 hour window to be safe. The maintenance mode update steps are:

      • On the file servers, offline all iSCSI volumes provisioned from this device.
      • Log in to the device serial interface with full access
      • Put the device in Maintenance mode: Enter-HcsMaintenanceMode, wait for the device to reboot
      • Identify available updates: Get-HcsUpdateAvailability, this should show available Maintenance mode updates (TRUE)
      • Start the update: Start-HcsUpdate
      • Monitor the update: Get-HcsUpdateStatus
      • When finished, exit maintenance mode: Exit-HcsMaintenanceMode, and wait for the device to reboot.

 

Advertisements

3 responses

  1. Pingback: StorSimple 8k series software version reference | Sam's Corner

  2. I’ve recently had a 8600 device installed and its is running version 1.2.
    As you noted it seems the updates are not showing as available through the portal straight away, is it possible to force it to look for the update via PowerShell or does that simply hit the same endpoint as the portal?

    Sorry if this is a dull question, however I’m fairly new to this and would like to get the device up and running with the latest firmware before we start utilising it.

    October 12, 2016 at 3:30 am

  3. Pingback: StorSimple 8k software release 4.0 | Sam's Corner

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s